Christian Hymns (1)

Hymn-Fathers-World

This is My Father’s World

… by Maltbie D. Babcock, 1901.

“This is My Father’s World” has the honor of being the first hymn in this series.  I give it this honor not because it contains the greatest theological insight, nor because it packs the greatest emotional wallop.  Rather, it’s because of the pure simplicity of thought placed within a beautiful tune.  And, because of its surprising shift between verses two and three that suddenly contrasts the beauty of God’s creation with the fallen state of our existence within context of God’s providence.  It is the most emotionally encouraging hymn ever written.

Additional background on the hymn can be found here and a beautiful rendition here (by Fernando Ortega).

1

This is my Father’s world,

And to my listening ears

All nature sings, and round me rings

The music of the spheres.

This is my Father’s world:

I rest me in the thought

Of rocks and trees, of skies and seas–

His hand the wonders wrought.

We are called to “listen” for God’s good work in creation, a rather surprising perspective given that it is the sense of sight that is far more commonly associated with this topic.  By so doing we are called to experience the beauty of creation at a deeper spiritual level, in which the surface beauty becomes only a thin veil covering God’s purposes.

2

This is my Father’s world:

The birds their carols raise,

The morning light, the lily white,

Declare their Maker’s praise.

This is my Father’s world:

He shines in all that’s fair;

In the rustling grass I hear Him pass,

He speaks to me everywhere.

We continue to listen as God conveys His truth through creation’s song.  All there offers up worship and praise to the Creator.

Now, the profound and unexpected turn occurs.

3

This is my Father’s world.

O let me ne’er forget

That though the wrong

Seems oft so strong,

God is the ruler yet.

This is my Father’s world:

The battle is not done:

Jesus who died shall be satisfied,

And earth and Heav’n be one.

What began as a beauteous celebration of God’s character as revealed by creation concludes with a meditation on the nature of our fallen state.  Yes, superimposed upon creation is a terrible power that distorts and attempts to destroy God’s purposes.  It has been there since time immemorial, and appears to hold all the levers of worldly power.

But sin and death has no real power in God’s world.  Though we mere mortals must live in its shadow, we yet can know with certainty that it has been defeated in the Person of Jesus Christ our Lord.  We therefore can fight the battle against evil with confidence that the victory has already been won.  And, that in the end, God will combine heaven and earth into that eternal perfection that we threw away in the fall.

It is this move from simple celebration of God’s creation to a contemplation on His response to our sin that raises this hymn from the realm of simple beauty to that of profound power to encourage and renew.

Amen

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